Welcome to the

Digital Impact Alliance (DIAL)

Advancing an inclusive digital society

Blog

June 28, 2017

The Digital Impact Alliance Announces Partnership with World Bank Identification for Development (ID4D) Initiative

By | Digital development, Global development, Newsroom, Technology

Washington, D.C. – As part of its efforts to ensure a more inclusive digital society, today the Digital Impact Alliance (DIAL) announced a partnership with the World Bank to support its identification for development (ID4D) efforts. The World Bank’s ID4D Initiative aims to help countries roll out robust and inclusive identification systems with multi-sectoral approaches and 21st century solutions.

ID4D“National identification systems are a core building block for effective and efficient digital services,” said Kate Wilson, CEO of DIAL. “Partnering with the World Bank’s ID4D team provides DIAL with an opportunity to help break down the barriers countries face to effective identification systems, including new approaches such as distributed hosting, authentication protocols and blockchain.”

There are an estimated 1.1 billion people around the world, largely in Asia and Africa, who do not have an officially recognized identification document, according to the World Bank. As countries roll-out different types of national-level identification mechanisms for national health systems, social safety nets and beyond, they are faced with a range of challenges including high costs and complex and unclear regulations. Even more challenging are the efforts to harmonize and align the country’s multiple existing or in-process identification programs.

To advance the understanding of new technologies, existing best practice technologies, and the legal and governance approaches that enable governments to build better in-country identification systems, the World Bank’s ID4D Initiative and DIAL will develop:

  • A key component in an operational guide that provides support to countries building ID systems, which will look at the benefits of new and existing technologies such as the incorporation of voice or iris into mobiles in delivering more effective identification systems; and
  • A case study, which highlights the role of unique identifiers in improving health service delivery. This will be part of a series of case studies which ID4D is pursuing to document individual countries’ experiences in implementing ID programs and thematic analysis of linkages between ID and effective service delivery.

“Having a formally recognized form of identity provides the poor and vulnerable with the opportunity to climb out of poverty,” said Vyjayanti Desai, Program Manager for Identification for Development (ID4D) at the World Bank. “This is critical for achieving a wide range of development outcomes: from opening a bank account and paving the way for broader financial inclusion to accessing education services, tracking childhood vaccinations, and empowering women. It can also strengthen the efficiency and effectiveness of the state in providing critical digital services, such as digitized government to person (G2P) payments, and reduce unnecessary waste of resources through better targeting.”

DIAL’s work with the World Bank’s ID4D Initiative aims to ensure country projects leverage the most accurate, cost-effective, and novel technological solutions in the design of their identification systems. To learn more about ID4D, and the Principles on Identification, which were facilitated by the World Bank Group and the Center for Global Development, and endorsed by DIAL and others, please visit: http://www.worldbank.org/en/programs/id4d

###

About DIAL

The Digital Impact Alliance (DIAL) aims to realize a more inclusive digital society in emerging markets, in which all women, men and children benefit from life-enhancing, mobile-based digital services. A partnership among USAID, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the Swedish Government and the United Nations Foundation, DIAL’s efforts help accelerate the collective efforts of government, industry and development organizations to realize this vision. www.digitalimpactalliance.org.

About the World Bank’s ID4D Program

The World Bank Group launched the Identification for Development (ID4D) Initiative to close the global identification gap and make progress toward robust and inclusive identification systems. Recognizing the transformational potential of modern, 21st century identification systems, the initiative aims to bring global knowledge and expertise across multiple sectors and countries to tackle the fundamental challenge of approximately 1.1 billion people who are unable to prove their identity. A multidonor platform, with catalytic support from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, focuses on support to developing countries, thought leadership, and global advocacy.

Press Contact
Paul Quirk, DIAL
Tel: +1-202-864-5148
pquirk@digitalimpactalliance.org

 

 

June 28, 2017

Youth Entrepreneurs and Digital Development

By | Blog, Digital development, Global development, ICT4D, Principles for Digital Development, Sustainable Development Goals, Tech innovations

Last month, I had the opportunity to attend the Digital Opportunity Trust (DOT) Youth Unconference in Kigali, Rwanda. The Unconference served as a platform for over 100 youths from 10 countries in the DOT network to come together and learn from each other’s experiences on ways to improve the impact of their social enterprises. To say these young people were an inspiration would be an understatement — they were intelligent, civic-minded, and passionate about technology and its ability to improve the economies of their countries.

For example, I met one young man developing sustainably produced menstruation pads, made from shredded banana leaf fiber, that sell for half the cost of normal pads allowing more young girls to stay in school when they otherwise would have to stay home. Another young woman produces and sells solar lamps to communities without power. I also met an entrepreneur who conceptualized a new method for inexpensively producing flour from carrots and other root vegetables that can be made into porridge as a safe solution to mother and child malnutrition.

The Unconference, with the theme of “Create Your Opportunity”, included youth-led workshops which focused on barriers to digital opportunities, and what youth can be doing to address those challenges. Many of these young people highlighted the way gender and culture factors into access and education around technology. More than one workshop discussed the digital gender divide, and discussed the importance of engaging girls in ICT as early as possible — and how to continue encouraging them as they get older. Christelle Kwizera, a panelist and mechanical engineer from Rwanda, put it this way: “When you start in primary school, everything looks normal. There are boys and girls. But when you go to college and engineering school, there are fewer women [and] you start to realize that all of your colleagues are male… You have no role models, so I wanted to return to Rwanda and be that role model.”

Group Photo from DOT Unconference

A group photo from Aisha’s workshop session on barriers for women in ICT.

My own session, which was co-led by an exceptional young woman named Aisha Abdul-Qadir, discussed how young people adopting the Principles of for Digital Development at an early stage can leverage digital technology to start companies, innovate new technologies, and/or improve their community. The Principles can serve as a guide to can help them achieve broader adoption and sustainability for their work. Participants in the session shared challenges they have faced in implementing programs in the past, what digital tools and solutions were available to them at the time, and what resources they wish they had. These insights will help our team at the Digital Impact Alliance (DIAL) shape new content that will be launched later this year.

It was such an honor to meet these young social entrepreneurs, each at a different stage of their journey. I believe it will be only a few years — if not sooner — until we see the impact they’ve made around the globe.

This blog was originally posted on the Digital Opportunity Trust’s Medium account. View it here.

 Allana Nelson joined the Digital Impact Alliance (DIAL) in March 2017 as the Program Manager for the Principles for Digital Development on the Insights and Impact team. In this position, she is responsible for promotion, education, and advocacy of the Principles. Prior to joining DIAL, Allana worked at USAID on technology-based solutions to the Ebola response and recovery efforts in West Africa.

 

 

back to top button